Feta Cheese Nutrition

Cheese. Just a mere mention of the word and one would think of sumptuous appetizers or meals served with them. Cheese, when served with wine, depicts impeccable taste and class. Here is but one of the many varieties of cheeses: Meet the Feta Cheese.

Look for fresh feta cheese in the chilled deli section of most supermarkets. Originating from Greece feta was made by peasants on the lower Balkan peninsula from sheep or goats milk. Feta is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months. It is a crumbly cheese and has a slightly grainy texture. Once removed from the brine it dries out rapidly. For many feta is an acquired taste and the aroma of it has been likened to the smell of bad feet.

Havarti has a buttery aroma and can be somewhat sharp in the stronger varieties. The taste is also buttery, and from somewhat sweet to very sweet, and it is slightly acidic. It is typically aged about three months, though when it is older it gets more salty and has a hazelnut flavor. When left at room temperature, the cheese tends to soften quickly. Flavored variants of Havarti include: cranberry, caraway, dill, peppered, jalapeno and garlic.

Radish make a very satisfying crop because they grow really fast. It is a member of the mustard family and is related to cabbage, horseradish and turnips. Theradish nutritional benefits date back to 2000 B.C. A healthy radish is firm to the touch and has a bright reddish color with green leaves that are great for juicing.

You have to have good nutrition in order to function all day and to be able to participate in physical activities. The FDA has developed the food pyramid to help people learn how to eat the right combination of foods to have a healthier lifestyle. Unfortunately, many people aren’t consuming the right balance of foods they need to maintain their long term health.

Kale is versatile, inexpensive, (a large bunch often costs less than $1.50) easy to cook and teeming with nutrients and minerals, taking top marks in almost every nutrient category. A one-cup serving of kale provides 354% of the recommended daily value (DV) of Vitamin A, 89% of Vitamin C, 1328% of Vitamin K, 10% -20% of Calcium, depending on the variety, and about 15% of dietary fiber.

You can substitute half or all of the higher fat ingredients. Be creative. For example, combine yogurt, garlic powder, lemon juice, a dash of pepper and Worcestershire sauce and use it to top a baked potato instead of piling on fat-laden sour cream.

Pregnancy and nutrition have a vital relationship and it is essential for women to have a well balanced meal. She has to provide her growing baby with minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients which are essential for the healthy growth of the infant. On the other hand there are some food items which should not be eaten as they can become hazardous to the mother as well as the developing baby.

Original Author: Baron Austin Full Bio
Tags: Nutrition

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